Capacity-building needs assessment to enhance financing for water infrastructure projects in Africa

Report Published: September 2020

Summary

The financing and development of water infrastructure is foundational to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Recent studies have raised the alarm that, despite efforts, the global community is not on track to achieve the water and sanitation targets outlined in SDG 6, and other connected targets.

The Africa-EU Water Partnership Project (AEWPP) is a joint undertaking by the European Union, the African Ministers Council on Water, and the Government of Sweden through the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), implemented by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI). The AEWPP seeks to improve financial viability of water infrastructure projects in Africa by targeting obstacles to accessing capital.

A key component of the AEWPP is to facilitate investment in water governance by identifying capacity- building and institutional development needs with a focus on infrastructure finance. Currently, there is a large gap between the need for water infrastructure investments and potentially available funding. A major obstacle contributing to this gap is that many of the implementing agencies are not sufficiently credible in terms of financial management and reporting. Accountability and transparency of the organizations and how financial resources are handled may not be robust enough for investors to make financial commitments. The project aims to identify capacity-building that could help overcome these obstacles. This report summarizes capacity-building assessments undertaken of six pilot projects as part of the overall AEWPP, including recommendations for ongoing engagement and support.

This is a report from the Africa-EU Water Partnership Project (AEWPP) – a project implemented by Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) on behalf of the European Union (EU), the African Ministers Council on Water (AMCOW), and the Government of Sweden. The project was financed by the European Commission. This report was financed by the International Centre for Water Cooperation (ICWC) hosted by SIWI under the auspices of UNESCO.